Skip to Main Content

The University of Tennessee

The College of Veterinary Medicine

Frequently Used Tools:





News Archive


Updates About Equine Herpes

March 13, 2013:  Dr. David Anderson talks to Dr. Melissa Hines about EHV and what horseowners need to know. Click here to wach the video. 

 

Update: Friday, September 30, 2011 8:10am

The Equine Hospital at the UT Veterinary Medical Center ended its 14 day quarantine (seven day state-mandated quarantine followed by our seven day self-imposed quarantine) at 8:00 a.m. this morning.  The hospital is now open and fully functional. As a precaution, our doctors tested all equines and camelids that were in our Equine and Large Animal Hospitals during the quarantine for the virus and received results yesterday: all tested negative for EHV-1. They are allowed to leave our facility starting today. Owners of horses that were in the hospital as outpatients when the index arrived and traveled to their respective stables prior to the definitive diagnosis have not reported any fevers or signs of neurologic disease in those patients. To our knowledge, there have been no new cases of EHV-1 reported in the area.

We would like to thank our clients for their patience and understanding during this two-week period.

The index premise remains under quarantine. No new cases have been diagnosed at that location. 

Update: Wednesday, September 28, 12:15pm

No new cases of EHV-1 at the Equine Hospital at the UT Veterinary Medical Center or at the index premise. The condition of the five horses isolated at the index premise remains stable.

Update: Tuesday, September 27, 3:40pm

No new cases of EHV-1 at the Equine Hospital at the UT Veterinary Medical Center or at the index premise.

Update: Monday, September 26, 5:08pm

No new cases of EHV-1 at the Equine Hospital at the UT Veterinary Medical Center or at the index premise.

Update: Saturday, September 24, 6:45pm

No new cases of EHV-1 at the Equine Hospital at the UT Veterinary Medical Center. 

No new cases of EHV-1 at the index premise. The entire herd continues to be monitored by taking temperatures twice a day in order to identify, isolate and test suspect cases. The five confirmed cases of EHV-1 remain in stable condition. 

To our knowledge, no horses in our area outside of the index premise have tested positive for EHV-1. For the welfare of the horse population, horse owners and those who work wth horses should, as always, be vigilant and continue to practice standard bio-security precautions such as strict hand hygiene and not sharing buckets or equipment between horses. Click here for additional information about bio-security.

There are many unknowns with this virus; the incubation period for this virus is one to ten days with the average being four to six days.  The most common way for EHV-1 to spread is by direct horse-to-horse contact.  It can also be spread indirectly through contact with physical objects (tack, wipe rags/grooming equipment, feed/water buckets, peoples' hands or clothing) contaminated with infectious virus.  The USDA brochure has additional information about the virus. 

Update: Friday, September 23, 12:15pm

Eight days after Sandy Jo was euthanized at the Equine Hospital at UT Veterinary Medical Center, there have been no new cases at the Equine Hospital. There have been no new cases or horses with fevers at the index premise. The five EHV-1 positive horses at the index premise remain isolated from the rest of the herd, and their conditions are stable. 

Update: Friday, September 23, 10:30am

A reminder that appointments at the UT Equine Hospital have been relocated to an off-site facility. In some instances, our ambulatory field service can provide medical care on-site for local owners. If  you have questions, call (865) 974-8387. The state quarantine at the UT Equine Hospital has expired but we remain under an additional seven-day self-imposed quarantine.

Udate: Thursday, September 22, 3:26pm

No new cases of EHV-1 have been diagnosed at Dixie Stampede (index premise), and no other horses at the index premise have exhibited signs of EHV-1. The condition of all five EHV-1 positive horses at the index premise appears to be stable and they remain isolated from the rest of the herd.

No new cases of EHV-1 have been diagnosed at the UT Equine Hospital.

Update: Thursday, September 22, 12:15pm

The Tennessee Department of Agriculture advises the equine industry and community to practice standard biosecurity measures. Click here to access the TDA EHV-1 site.  

Update: Thurdsay, September 22, 7:45am

The EHV-1 Forum for horseowners was webcast, and the recording is now available online. Lots of information included in the presentation.

Update: Wednesday, September 21, 5:45pm

Independent tests have confirmed six horses in total have been diagnosed with EHV-1, all from a single location. The first horse, Sandy Jo, was euthanized at the Equine Hospital at the UT Veterinary Medical Center within hours of being admitted September 15. The other five horses remain isolated at the Dixie Stampede and are being treated for the virus.

No new cases of EHV-1 have been diagnosed at the UT Equine Hospital.

**In working with local veterinarians and the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, our equine faculty have not identified any cases of EHV-1 outside the index premise.**

Update: Wednesday, September 21, 11:52am

No new cases of EHV-1 have been diagnosed at the UT Equine Hospital. The EHV-1 informational meeting for horse owners will be held in room A118 at the UT College of Veterinary Medicine, 2407 River Drive on the UT agricultural campus in Knoxville. The event will also be webcast. Click here to access the webcast.  Click here for driving directions. 

Update: Tuesday, September 20, 5:20pm

No new cases of EHV-1 have been diagnosed at the UT Equine Hospital.  Scroll down to bottom of this page for information from the USDA about biosecurity on the farm.

Update: Tuesday, September 20, 11:15am

No new cases of EHV-1 have been diagnosed at the UT Equine Hospital. 

The EHV-1 Informational Forum for horse owners will be webcast at 7pm Wednesday, September 21. Follow this link to access the webcast.  The site will post "waiting for presentation to begin" until 7pm Wednesday. **The webcast will be archived for those who are unable to view it live.**

Update: Monday, September 19, 5:25pm

We are planning a forum for horse owners Wednesday, Sept. 21 at 7pm. Plans are being made to webcast the forum. More information will be posted. 

Update: Monday, September 19

At this time no new cases of EHV-1 have been diagnosed at the UT Equine Hospital. The UT Diagnostic Laboratory and an independent laboratory confirmed the index horse that was euthanized within hours of being admitted last Thursday had the neurologic form of EHV-1.

(Knoxville, TN. September 16, 2011)-- The Tennessee State Veterinarian has placed the  Equine Hospital at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center under a seven day quarantine. The Veterinary Medical Center expects to maintain voluntary isolation for an additional seven days as clinicians investigate a neurologic case caused by a contagious strain of a virus. Due to the potential for spread of Equine Herpes Virus type 1 (EHV-1) among horses and camelids, movement to and from the equine hospital is restricted.

It is important to note there is not currently an active case of EHV-1 in the hospital, and we are taking every precaution to prevent the spread of disease.

Thursday, September 15, a down horse was brought to the Equine Hospital at the UT Veterinary Medical Center at 2:00 p.m.  The horse was kept in a separate area of the equine hospital. Within hours, the horse's condition deteriorated, and the animal was euthanized. 

EHV is a common virus found in horse populations around the world. Almost all horses older than two years of age have been exposed to it.  While many horses can carry the virus with no or minimal signs of illness, it occasionally causes some to develop serious clinical signs; therefore, we are exercising an abundance of precaution in our equine hospital.  It is unknown what causes some horses to develop the serious neurological form, however most cases are associated with a mutated form of the virus. EHV-1 can manifest itself in four ways: neurological form, respiratory disease, abortion, and neonatal death. The neurological form is called Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM).  It is not contagious to people.

The United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) has issued A Guide To Understanding the Neurologic Form of EHV Infection that details information about the transmission of EHV-1, clinical signs and diagnosis of EHM, and ways to prevent spreading the virus to other horses and camelids.

The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) has assembled a list of frequently asked questions. Click here for the FAQ.

The AAEP has also assembled useful websites with links to information forhorseowners and for veterinarians.

Also from the USDA, Biosecurity--The Key to Keeping Your Horses Healthy which includes information about disinfectants and footbaths.

Appointments at the UTCVM Equine Hospital have been relocated to an off-site facility. In some instances, our ambulatory field service can provide medical care on-site for local owners. If  you have questions, call (865) 974-8387. 

 

 

 

 

Posted: 09-16-11 Viewed: 15454 times

Media Relations

Sandra Harbison
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Tennessee
2407 River Drive
Knoxville, TN 37996

Dog Bite Prevention Knox Cattlemen UT Veterinary MRI